Tuesday, August 21, 2012

52 Reasons to Hate My Father - Jessica Brody

Synopsis: Lexington Larrabee has never to work a day in her life. After all, she’s the heiress to the multi-billion-dollar Larrabee Media empire. And heiresses are not supposed to work. But then again, they’re not supposed to crash brand new Mercedes convertibles into convenience stores on Sunset Blvd either.
Which is why, on Lexi’s eighteen birthday, her ever-absent, tycoon father decides to take a more proactive approach to her wayward life. Every week for the next year, she will have to take on a different low-wage job if she ever wants to receive her beloved trust fund. But if there’s anything worse than working as a maid, a dishwasher, and a fast-food restaurant employee, it’s dealing with Luke, the arrogant, albeit moderately attractive, college intern her father has assigned to keep tabs on her.In a hilarious “comedy of heiress” about family, forgiveness, good intentions, and best of all, second chances, Lexi learns that love can be unconditional, money can be immaterial, and, regardless of age, everyone needs a little saving. And although she might have 52 reasons to hate her father, she only needs one reason to love him. (From Goodreads) 

I actually met Jessica Brody a couple weeks ago at The Tattered Cover in Colorado. When she was talking about writing 52 Reasons, she spoke about how reading and writing is like getting to take on other roles - to see how others live. Which is pretty much what this book does. For a few hundred pages you get to see what it's like to live the life of the rich and fabulous. And also to briefly try on the roles of those who work minimum wage jobs. Both of which, it turns out, have their fun moments.

I honestly don't know where to start talking about Lexi though. This girl is a piece of work - but, at the same time, she's really not. It's perfectly legit to blame all of her behavioral issues on her upbringing and her environment. She has unlimited resources and no supervision - yeah, I'd probably act like Paris Hilton too. She also has lost her mother, her father rarely even speaks to her, and her brothers are scattered all over. She's raised by the people her father pays. So, yeah, I'll say she has a good excuse for who she is.

I kind of wanted to hate her at the beginning, but even as a spoiled brat, she's kind of charming about it. It's almost as if she knows her diva personality is something she can turn off and on - you can see her snap in and out of it. She uses her image as a weapon, and even when it doesn't work, you have to admire he for it.

But the other fun part about this book is seeing her work all these jobs. I never watched Simple Life - but now I kind of get the appeal. Although, I highly doubt Paris and Nicole ever had the humbling experience and personal growth through their performances that Lexi has. She's not just learning about what it's like to work, but she's learning the identity that comes with being a certain kind of worker.

For the most part you can kind of see where the book is going - personal growth, family healing, etc. But it actually really surprised me. There was a bit of a revelation towards the end that I was not expecting - a revelation that pulled a few tears out of me. This was enough for me to bump this book up from good - to amazing. I definitely recommend getting lost in the life of this heiress for awhile, it's well worth it.

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Tuesday, August 21, 2012

52 Reasons to Hate My Father - Jessica Brody

Synopsis: Lexington Larrabee has never to work a day in her life. After all, she’s the heiress to the multi-billion-dollar Larrabee Media empire. And heiresses are not supposed to work. But then again, they’re not supposed to crash brand new Mercedes convertibles into convenience stores on Sunset Blvd either.
Which is why, on Lexi’s eighteen birthday, her ever-absent, tycoon father decides to take a more proactive approach to her wayward life. Every week for the next year, she will have to take on a different low-wage job if she ever wants to receive her beloved trust fund. But if there’s anything worse than working as a maid, a dishwasher, and a fast-food restaurant employee, it’s dealing with Luke, the arrogant, albeit moderately attractive, college intern her father has assigned to keep tabs on her.In a hilarious “comedy of heiress” about family, forgiveness, good intentions, and best of all, second chances, Lexi learns that love can be unconditional, money can be immaterial, and, regardless of age, everyone needs a little saving. And although she might have 52 reasons to hate her father, she only needs one reason to love him. (From Goodreads) 

I actually met Jessica Brody a couple weeks ago at The Tattered Cover in Colorado. When she was talking about writing 52 Reasons, she spoke about how reading and writing is like getting to take on other roles - to see how others live. Which is pretty much what this book does. For a few hundred pages you get to see what it's like to live the life of the rich and fabulous. And also to briefly try on the roles of those who work minimum wage jobs. Both of which, it turns out, have their fun moments.

I honestly don't know where to start talking about Lexi though. This girl is a piece of work - but, at the same time, she's really not. It's perfectly legit to blame all of her behavioral issues on her upbringing and her environment. She has unlimited resources and no supervision - yeah, I'd probably act like Paris Hilton too. She also has lost her mother, her father rarely even speaks to her, and her brothers are scattered all over. She's raised by the people her father pays. So, yeah, I'll say she has a good excuse for who she is.

I kind of wanted to hate her at the beginning, but even as a spoiled brat, she's kind of charming about it. It's almost as if she knows her diva personality is something she can turn off and on - you can see her snap in and out of it. She uses her image as a weapon, and even when it doesn't work, you have to admire he for it.

But the other fun part about this book is seeing her work all these jobs. I never watched Simple Life - but now I kind of get the appeal. Although, I highly doubt Paris and Nicole ever had the humbling experience and personal growth through their performances that Lexi has. She's not just learning about what it's like to work, but she's learning the identity that comes with being a certain kind of worker.

For the most part you can kind of see where the book is going - personal growth, family healing, etc. But it actually really surprised me. There was a bit of a revelation towards the end that I was not expecting - a revelation that pulled a few tears out of me. This was enough for me to bump this book up from good - to amazing. I definitely recommend getting lost in the life of this heiress for awhile, it's well worth it.

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